nongame

Manatee Recovery

The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus), one of only four species of sirenians that exist in the world, is the only member of the order Sirenia that lives in the United States. Large seal-shaped creatures with flippers as forelimbs and paddle-like rounded tails, manatees average 10 feet in length and 1,000–2,500 lbs in weight as adults. These slow-moving creatures, also known as "sea cows." spend most of their time eating, resting or traveling in the rivers, estuaries, saltwater bays, creeks and canals along the coast.

Snake Information & Resources

Snakes of Georgia

Snakes are common across Georgia, even in urban and suburban areas. As development and population growth continue in Georgia, encounters between humans and snakes will increase.

Georgia is fortunate to have among the highest biodiversity of snakes in the United States with 46 species. Snakes can be found from the mountains of northern Georgia to the barrier islands along the Atlantic coast. The rich diversity of snake species makes Georgia ideal for observing and learning about snakes.

Prescribed Fire in Georgia

Prescribed fire is a critical and potent management tool for fire-dependent natural communities. It is one of the most effective, efficient and economical ways to manage Georgia’s forest lands and ecosystems while also minimizing the risk of wildfires. Prescribed fire is a safe way to apply a natural process that benefits habitat restoration and species recovery. It can affect the ecology of sites for decades, and is considered the only tool to spur the recovery of some endangered species.

Invasive Species

Georgia Invasive Species Strategy

The variety of native species found in Georgia is in part a reflection of the range of landscapes that make up the state. From the mixed forests and woodlands of the north Georgia mountains, to the low rolling hills of Central Georgia, to the swampy lowland, marshes and barrier islands of the coast, the state’s various ecosystems make Georgia the sixth most biologically diverse state in the Union.

Georgia Ginseng Management Program

Program History

The Georgia ginseng harvest season is from September 1 through December 31.

Export of American Ginseng is regulated under The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, which is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The export of Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) from Georgia is authorized by this federal authority in combination with the Georgia Ginseng Protection Act of 1979, as amended in 2013.