bird

Youth Christmas Bird Count

Traditional Christmas Bird Counts (CBC) feature 8-hour days and lots of driving. This Youth CBC is specifically for kids. There is no driving, and the count lasts just 2.5 hours. Teams of kids ages 8-16 will be led by experienced birders as they search the fields and forests of the Charlie Elliott Wildlife Center for birds. After lunch, kids can present their findings and we will have a birds of prey presentation. 

The Southern Rivers Birding Trail

Come take a trek of discovery along Georgia's Southern Rivers Birding Trail. The trail winds its way from the rolling hills of the Georgia Piedmont on the north southward across the broad expanse of the Coastal Plain before curling eastward and eventually terminating in the Okefenokee Swamp, the Land of Trembling Earth. 

Georgia's Colonial Coast Birding Trail

Welcome to the Colonial Coast Birding Trail

Coastal Georgia is steeped in human and natural history. Since the first human inhabitants colonized the coast, man and the abundant natural resources found here have been inexorably linked. A visit to one or more sites along the Colonial Coast Birding Trail will provide you with the opportunity to see and enjoy the beauty of a kaleidoscope of birds and glimpse the fascinating history of this land and its residents.

Out My Backdoor: The Great Crested Flycatcher

By Terry W. Johnson

Recently, on a cool April morning I stepped out onto my deck and was greeted with a chorus of bird songs. I heard the songs of some of the birds that are familiar year-round residents in my neighborhood –the northern cardinal, Carolina wren, chipping sparrow, northern mockingbird, pine warbler and eastern towhee. Then suddenly I heard a call that I had not heard this year. From the back of my 3-acre lot came a loud wheep. I knew immediately the great crested flycatcher was back.

Out My Backdoor: Feed Birds With Flowers in Fall

By Terry W. Johnson

The stress of the long, hot summer is beginning to show on the flowers in my backyard. For weeks, the zinnias, salvias, coneflowers and a host of others along with untold numbers of hummingbirds and butterflies attracted to them have treated my family to a veritable kaleidoscope of color. Knowing that soon the flowers time will be over, I must admit that I am filled with mixed emotions. Hummingbirds are departing in droves. As the flowers continue to wither and die, the butterflies will also disappear.

Out My Backdoor: Hummingbird Migration Begins in Your Backyard

By Terry W. Johnson

For the past several weeks, hummingbird fanciers have enjoyed watching squadrons of ruby-throated hummingbirds displaying their aeronautical skills in backyards across the state. These tiny dynamos have been flying between feeders and flowers, gorging themselves on sugar water and nectar. When they haven't been feeding, they seem to have been trying to keep others from enjoying the sweet bounty.

While we find their activities entertaining, to hummingbirds it is a matter of life and death.